Taz - 2004


Social Gaming Tokyo Japan
Sound of Water We can foresee a whole new geography, a kind of pilgrimage-map in which holy sites are replaced by peak experiences and TAZs: a real science of psychotopography, perhaps to be called "geo-autonomy" or "anarchomancy." Hakim Bey Hakim Bey's Temporary Autonomous Zone (TAZ) mourned the loss of any land without frontiers, the existence of unknown spaces left to "discover," of pirate utopias, and at the same time, Bey wrote his TAZ provocation to fire us up and take back our real world as well as our psychological territory from overbearing corporate-state systems. Twenty years after writing his text, it seems that even the web, which he touted as a window of autonomy, has become a set of byte-built Nation States, policed by an Interpol-like "Predator," divvied up and consumed by fitness-proven systems like Google that start off feral but sooner or later go "corporate." The Hubble and its successors pry ever further into the depths of the universe, flattening the numbered cosmos into an excel spreadsheet, while DNA is unraveled before our very eyes, as if God has handed over the key to a landlord with a corporate logo on his lapel. The TAZ has moved from a tentative ideal to an endangered speculation. Positioned here on the Rim, we look out onto a liquid ocean that covers half the planet, and it is almost impossible not to sense the presence of a vast "undocumented" piece of Earth that should equally be called planet "Water." And, as we stare outwards on the eastern edge, we can perhaps hear the echo of Matsuo Basho's famous haiku: An old pond a frog jumps in Sound of water And the realization sinks in, that this massive in-between-zone is a mirror-like "space of mind." In the Beginning Was the Word, not! When we consider the Atlantic rim, the countries that border it, for better or for worse in general speak or include among their official languages some sort of Latin-based dialect, that shares a common alphabet. Communication is automatically intelligible across the rim, and so the Atlantic has become a semi-conductor of in-bred, traditional protocol. Not so with the Pacific: the languages and etymologies are so diverse, ranging from ideograms, to grapheme based language to alphabet, causing human interaction across these linguistic chasms to move away from the Word into sensory based communication: away from linear missives and towards immersive symbiosis. Is there a language beyond words? From Protocol to Psycho-col The parallel processing, schema-based protocols of gaming mirror the workings of the mind. Fairy stories or Pavlov: whichever way you read it, narrative archetype or behavioral conditioning, there is a common pool of sub and supra language based communication that finds its perfect home in the Rim gaming world. It is on the leading edge of these games, such as the force-feedback Japanese game Rez, in which sound, touch, orgasm and vision all come together in one primal explosion that a space before, between and beyond words is regained. This space is not of the type that has been deciphered by NASA, capturing silent, subvocal speech, or words that remain unspoken that are then vocalized by machine. Neither is it one that is colonized by written concept and spoken word, processes that in themselves have been so over-used as to have become what Christof Koch would call "zombie behaviors." The time has come to bypass word-driven mental processes altogether. So much so, that the very vehicle upon which this essay is written, namely words, becomes increasingly tenuous…and a new non-verbal language of neural, sensory and emotional interchange takes over. Marcos lutyens MindBrowser 2004 © Co-authors of Chill Marcos Lutyens Michael Backes Collaboration: Yasushi Ishida, Daniela Frogheri Chill Biofeedback replaces buttons and joysticks. Using their minds, players generate the visuals, sounds and force-feedback sensations. A ten-minute inversion.

Co-authors of Chill Marcos Lutyens Michael Backes Collaboration: Yasushi Ishida, Daniela Frogheri Chill Biofeedback replaces buttons and joysticks. Using their minds, players generate the visuals, sounds and force-feedback sensations. A ten-minute inversion.